Brí

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  • #36358
    Séril Báicéir
    Participant

    Cad is brí leis “abú”? Feicim an focal go minic ar an grúpa Gaeilge Amháin ar Facebook.

    #42559
    Dáithí
    Participant
    #42561
    Lughaidh
    Participant

    Nì hea, “abù” = go deo / forever
    Tìr Chonaill abù = Tìr Chonaill forever!

    #42562
    Séril Báicéir
    Participant

    Tuigim anois! Go raibh maith agat, a Lughaidh!

    Any reason this word would have been excluded from the dictionaries that I looked at?

    #42563
    Dáithí
    Participant

    Besides the link I showed above, http://www.irishdictionary.ie, here’s another source that indicates that abú also means “”hooray” (to victory): http://www.irelandabu.ie/. Quoting that source: “abú” is particularly used within the GAA (Gaelic games) to show support for your county team and is an Irish word that is very much ‘alive’ in parts of the country.”

    I don’t mean to offend any of the traditionalists here, but is it possible that the postings that Séril is seeing on Facebook are using abú to mean “hooray” and that it’s a recent development in the meaning of the word, as described above?

    #42564
    Dáithí
    Participant

    From Irish Gaelic Translator, I found this discussion, http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic71438.html ,which also indicates that abú means “hooray.”

    abú is something you put after a word to encourage it, or say something like hooray for… etc…

    na cailíní = the girls

    na cailíní abú! – would be something along the lines of ‘come on the girls’, ‘up the girls’, ‘horray for the girls’ and so on…

    #42566
    Séril Báicéir
    Participant

    A Dháithí, feicim anois. I do see it used in that way and that way makes pretty good sense.

    #42567
    aonghus
    Participant

    http://www.potafocal.com/Metasearch.aspx?Text=abú&GotoID=focloirbeag

    abú [intriacht]
    gáir mhaíte.

    It is an interjection and “hooray” is probably the closest English equivalent: but it needs to be applied to something), you couldn’t use it on its own as you could hooray.

    Dictionaries often skip this kind of tricky thing!

    #42570
    jimnuaeabhrac
    Participant

    I have seen it used as a battle cry for armies. So I don’t think it is just something an audience member would shout, but also something a member of the team/army would say to urge their group on.

    Like “Onward to Victory!”

    #42571
    aonghus
    Participant

    That is true: it is also common in Irish versions of family mottoes.

    I haven’t been able to find anything in DIL.

    Dinneen suggests:
    {interjection}, to victory! {perhaps} {abbreviation} for GO BUAIDH. Used in battle-cries, as CROM ABÚ! LÁMH DHEARG ABÚ!

    #42573
    Séril Báicéir
    Participant

    It’s interesting how one word can have so much history behind it. 🙂

    #42574
    aonghus
    Participant

    Most words do!

    #42605
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    If you know any Spanish, it’s similar to the way “viva” (live) is used, I think. The “hooray” sentiment is really expressed by your wishing that this thing (whatever it is) would continue indefinitely.

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