císte crón

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  • #44005
    Daithi Carr
    Participant

    I have the book , and i showed it to my teachers here in Corca dhuibhne and they thought it was a good resource , especially since it had CD’s to accompany it.

    Apart from being fairly centered around giving instructions to children , for a complete beginner like me the audio can be very fast.
    Still thought id highly recommend it.

    #44006
    Daithi Carr
    Participant


    Ach tarlaíonn sé scaití go mbíonn leagan “teaghlaigh” ag duine nach eol dó bheith “teaghlach”.

    is this common , that there might be family words unknown more widely ? dont think its the case in English much ?

    #44008
    Daithi Carr
    Participant

    AS far as i Know they are all native speakers. it says so in the books, the readers names suggest so too, and if my teachers in the gaeltacht think its a good cd to learn pronunciation from Id take that as an additional sign of it being a good resource.

    #44010
    Daithi Carr
    Participant

    I didnt think there were still any isolated networks left outside the offical gaeltachts. sure in some official ones now the language exists just in such networks.

    Is there anywhere you can read about these speakers/ groups ?
    for example if I gogole, Beara Irish etc. not much comes up.

    #44013
    Daithi Carr
    Participant

    Ah I thought it was suggested that there were some existing networks of traditional Irish speakers existing outside the gaeltacht which may have contributed to this book.

    #44015
    eadaoin
    Participant

    English speaking families do sometimes make up words (often based on something a child has said/misunderstood) .. but normally the family members would realize it was a “family” word.
    Growing up, one of ours was the “ceo-horn” instead of foghorn, and perfect stuff was “little bear” as in Goldilocks …
    and my kids drank “lim” instead of milk, even as teenagers!

    eadaoin

    #44016
    An Lon Dubh
    Participant

    In An Gort Broc, a collection of folklore from a single speaker in Beara, it’s clear that the language had already passed out of common usage in the area and the speaker was one of the few left who could speak it well. Nevertheless loss or sporadic use of lenition where one would expect it to occur shows some weakening of the speaker’s own Irish, isolated as he probably was from other speakers.

    There is a similar sort of effect to be seen in “Seanachas ó Chairbre”. Seán Ó hAo, the speaker used in the work, often misses lenition and eclipses and frequently uses the nominative singular form of adjectives regardless of case and number (although not inflecting the noun for case is a common thing in Munster I think). However there is an indication that he knew the “correct” forms and also some indications that what seem like errors are features of the Cairbre dialect going back to when the area was completely Irish speaking.

    Really good book by the way, the speakers vocabulary is enormous and there is a rake of words not be found even in Dineen.

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