Money

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  • #36248
    Aislingeach
    Participant

    TYI has the phrase “Cúig puint, sé scillinge agus seacht bpingine” for “Five pounds, six shillings and sevenpence.” I was wondering what changes there may have been in terms for currency since the change to the Euro. I can’t seem to find a list of “money” words anywhere….

    GRMA

    #41793

    B’fhéidir “Cúig euro, nócha naoi gceint” agus a leithéid?

    #41804
    Cúnla
    Participant

    Níor chuala mise “ceint” á rá ag aon duine…

    #41890
    Bríd Mhór
    Participant

    deich euro agus sé cent

    Tá an litriú mar a gcéanna i chuile theanga Europach.

    #41891
    aonghus
    Participant

    Ach níl an fhoghraíocht!

    #41892
    aonghus
    Participant

    Scríobh Michael Everson aiste spéisiúil ar an gceist

    http://www.evertype.com/standards/euro/euro-eora-ga.pdf

    #41897
    Aislingeach
    Participant

    Scríobh Michael Everson aiste spéisiúil ar an gceist

    http://www.evertype.com/standards/euro/euro-eora-ga.pdf

    Cúig leathanach. Is dúshlán é seo!

    #41901
    Aislingeach
    Participant

    Would someone be kind enough to tell me if I am reading this paragraph correctly?

    The paragraph:
    In áit iarraidh ar na Ballstáit ionchur a bheith acu i dtaca le húsáid cheart ainm an airgeadra ina dteangacha féin, is amhlaidh atá an Chomhairle Eorpach tar éis a rialú gur mar a chéile a bheidh litriú an airgeadra agus litriú fhoroinn an airgeadra sin i dteangacha oifigiúlauile an Aontais Eorpaigh. Thairis sin, tá rialaithe acu gur mar a chéile a bheidh uimhir uatha agus uimhir iolra na bhfocal euro agus cent i roinnt de na teangacha sin.

    My understanding:
    Instead of asking member states about the right usage of the name of the money in their various languages, the EC ruled that the spelling of the money and the spelling of its subunit would be the same in all of the EU’s official languages. And that, additionally, they (have ruled?) that the singular and plural of the words Euro and cent will be the same in some of these languages?

    It seems, in part, a rather bizarre edict, given the linguistic differences involved, so I’m thinking I may have misunderstood something.

    GRMA

    #41902
    aonghus
    Participant

    Unlike the bureaucrats, you have understood correctly.

    #41905
    Bríd Mhór
    Participant

    I think it is a good idea to have it written as “Euro” and “Cent” in every country that the currrency is used.

    It annoys me when people say in English “Euros” or “cents”.

    #41906
    Hugo
    Participant

    I think it is a good idea to have it written as “Euro” and “Cent” in every country that the currrency is used.

    It annoys me when people say in English “Euros” or “cents”.

    Stupid name. Stupid currency. Stupid grammar. Stupid Eurocrats.

    #41907
    Cúnla
    Participant

    It’s a “common currency,” right? But since not everyone can understand all the other members’ languages anyways… cheal nach scríobhfaí € agus ¢ nó a leithéidí ins chuile theanga dá mbeifí ag iarraidh bheith caighdeánúil agus so-aitheanta, cuirim i gcás, comharthaí scríofa a d’aithneofaí ins chuile áit, b’fhéidir—agus gan bacadh leis na teangacha labhartha chor ar bith?

    $ is ¢ againn anseo i Meiriceá—maille le “dollar,” “buck,” “cent,” “penny,” “nickel,” “dime,” “quarter,” “stack,” “benjamin,” “bill,” “hunnid,” “greenback,” “peso,” “simoleon,” is pé ar bith cén téarmaíocht eile, bíodh sí oifigiúil nó ná bíodh… gan dlí gan deacracht.

    “Dollars” is “cents” is mó a scríobhtar, ’ar ndóigh—nó $ is ¢, mar adeirim.

    Tá [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/50_Cent]50 Cent[/url] againn (cé gurb é “50 cents” nó “50¢” nó “$0.50” a bheadh caighdeánúil anseo i Meiriceá)—ab é an chaoi a gcuirfí an dlí ar mo dhuine dá mbaisteadh sé “50 Cents” air féin thall ansiúd san Eoraip?! 😛

    Níl mé ach ag magadh… But really, it does seem somewhat odd to try to enforce new spoken norms that might or might not fit well with existing ones on such a wide variety of cultures &c….

    I’m sure it’s been debated a million times before, but I guess it still seems strange to me as an American…

    #41910
    Aislingeach
    Participant

    GRMA, a Aonghuis, for checking my translation. I’ve gotten through the first page, and it is, indeed, an interesting article. GRMA as an nasc.

    #41922

    I think it is a good idea to have it written as “Euro” and “Cent” in every country that the currrency is used.

    It annoys me when people say in English “Euros” or “cents”.

    “Cent” is a rather old modern word in most languages by now, but “Euro”, maybe not. Some languages make it easy to give a natural declension to new words, others don’t.

    I have understood that Irish allows leaving countable nouns in the singular case after numerals, as well as leaving some “foreign imports” with their original spelling and immune to mutations, so there’s little trouble so far.

    In the case of English, the natural sounding plural case is easy to form and I don’t see why not treat the money words like other countable nouns. The same goes for Finnish, where the singular partitive is used for non-1 numbers.

    #41923
    Lughaidh
    Participant

    In French, everybody puts “euro” in the plural in writing (in speech you don’t make any difference between “euro” and “euros” since plural s’s aren’t pronounced).
    And most people use “centimes” (ie. the old “smaller” currency) instead of “cents”.
    I think Lithuanian speakers do decline “euro” too – btw they decline everything, they even adapt foreign names with Lithuanian endings so that they can decline them 🙂

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