Question re: verb “analaigh”

Fáilte (Welcome) Forums General Discussion (Irish and English) Question re: verb “analaigh”

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  • #36955
    maegan
    Participant

    Hi,

    I am trying to find the correct word for the command “breathe.” I found the word analaigh with the definition “to breathe,” but what if you give a command? I found the word “analaim,” but if I understand correctly, the ending (“im”) is only applied if the verb is an irregular verb and “analaigh” is not irregular. (Sorry for the lack of accent marks.)

    In English, for example, if someone stops breathing you tell them “breathe!” That’s the tense I’m looking for but in Gaelic.

    Any assistance is appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Maegan

    #46111
    Labhrás
    Participant

    Hi,

    I am trying to find the correct word for the command “breathe.” I found the word analaigh with the definition “to breathe,” but what if you give a command? I found the word “analaim,” but if I understand correctly, the ending (“im”) is only applied if the verb is an irregular verb and “analaigh” is not irregular. (Sorry for the lack of accent marks.)

    In English, for example, if someone stops breathing you tell them “breathe!” That’s the tense I’m looking for but in Gaelic.

    Any assistance is appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Maegan

    In Irish the imperative (command) form is the “name” of the verb.
    So, the imperative form of análaigh is análaigh:

    Análaigh! = Breathe!

    (Edit) BTW1: This is the command form for 2nd person singular only.
    In 2nd person plural it is:

    Análaígí = Breathe (ye all)!

    BTW2: Please note the accent on second a: análaigh

    BTW3:
    -im is the ending of first person present tense (regular and irregular verbs):
    análaím = I breathe

    #46115
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    To give a general tip based on what Labhras has already said, note that some dictionaries (De Bhaldraithe), the verb form is given in the first person present tense. Not all dictionaries follow this (O Donaill, for example, does not), but just be aware of it when you are looking up words. A big part of using an Irish dictionary well (or any language for that matter) is learning how to decipher and contextualize what it’s telling you, which gets easier as your knowledge of the language increases, of course. Good luck!

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