Duncan

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  • in reply to: Go n-éirí an bóthar libh? #45965
    Duncan
    Participant

    Very interesting! To tell you the truth, I had wondered whether this might have something to do with a possible reference to “leis an gcéile” while omitting the article. But I had never considered the possibility that the phrase “a chéile” is simply used as as the object of “le,” with the “a” skipped today. Thanks for pointing out this connection; the lenition now makes perfect sense. I appreciate the information.

    in reply to: Go n-éirí an bóthar libh? #45963
    Duncan
    Participant

    Thank you for both your answers; that pretty much settles each of my questions. I had suspected that le chéile was something that “just happened” over the years, but was always wondering if there was something obvious that I was missing. And yes, chuile was another thing I had been curious about. Thanks again for the input.

    in reply to: “Abair” nó “scríobh?” #45577
    Duncan
    Participant

    Sounds great. I’ll look into this later today. It’s nice to learn about this sort of thing; I appreciate all the help I get on this forum. Thanks much!

    in reply to: “Abair” nó “scríobh?” #45575
    Duncan
    Participant

    Thanks for the information. I just Googled and found it (I should have thought to try that before). Another great benefit of this forum: learning about resources I never knew existed! I’ll be sure to check it out–thanks! :coolsmile:

    in reply to: “Abair” nó “scríobh?” #45573
    Duncan
    Participant

    From your replies I gather that “say” can be used as a general term for “communicate (in any form)” in both languages. I especially like the suggestion of “tuariscítear” to specify that something is “reported.” BTW, what is TG4, and how do I get there? I’ve been referred to Nuacht before, and would enjoy watching it. GRMA arís!

    in reply to: Independent clause preceded by dependent clause #45417
    Duncan
    Participant

    I hadn’t thought of that possibility; very good point for a way to achieve this. GRMA, Hugo.

    in reply to: Independent clause preceded by dependent clause #45415
    Duncan
    Participant

    Thanks to both of you. I think that clears things up. Sorry about a lapse of memory with that second question, Labhrás. I often forget about the direct/indirect types of clause, so thanks for putting it in a way that’s easier to remember. I take this to mean that, although clois is an irregular verb, it just has the one past tense so I should choose a or ar the same way I would with a regular verb.

    I like your suggestions for emphasis, Cúnla!
    Go raibh maith agaibh!

    Duncan
    Participant

    OK, thanks for the clarifications, both of you. GRMA faoin gcabhair, mar i gconaí, a chách!

    Duncan
    Participant

    You left at least one out: “is gá duit …”

    GRMA, Héilics Órbhuí. I hadn’t run across that expression before; as a matter of fact, it’s the first time I’ve run into the word ! I imagine, then, that “Is gá dom rud a dhéanamh” would be a good expression to use for “I need to do something,” right?

    Up to now I’ve been using díth to express a need, e.g. “Tá rud de dhíth orm” to say “I need something,” although I understand that it’s really more like saying “I don’t have something.” Is “Tá gá agam le rud” perhaps a more acceptable way of stressing the actual need for something, leaving díth to point out the lack of the object? I appreciate the input.

    Duncan
    Participant

    Again, thanks. It’s helpful to see some potential English equivalents such as you’ve provided. After all, there are many different expressions we use in English to say “must” as well. I now have a far better idea of how to apply the various Irish phrases. It looks as if the all-purpose phrases that would work with just about anything are “caithfidh tú” and “tá ort.”

    Incidentally, from the standpoint of “must not,” I’ve followed some of the links above, and see that “caithfidh tú gan” works. It appears that the imperative is used more often than in English; for example, I have a copy of the standard Catholic Irish Bible, and see that “thou shalt not kill” (Ex. 20:13) comes out very simply as “ná déan marú!”

    I appreciate all the help I get in this forum. Tá súil agam nach crá croí mé, leis an oiread sin ceisteanna. [Hmm…ar dúirt mé é sin ceart?] 🙂

    Duncan
    Participant

    Thanks, Cúnla, another one I hadn’t known about! I’m pretty new to this forum, and it’s great to get such good input from everyone on this site. GRMA, a chách!

    Duncan
    Participant

    Great link! I don’t know how I missed finding that among my searches. I see it’s part of “Foclóir.ie” as is the Corpas na Gaeilge. I’ve added that to my bookmarks. GRMA, a Sheánín.

    in reply to: Quick follow-up question on genitive “strings” #45395
    Duncan
    Participant

    OK, I had been wondering if the genitive form was dropped from just the noun, or from the adjective as well. (I had also considered using “mhór” to match “theach.”) Your solution makes the best sense of all; GRMA, a Labhrás.

    in reply to: Imperative usage in a group #45381
    Duncan
    Participant

    Pé scéal é, ní raibh ann ach píosa spraoi, tá ardmheas agam ar chanúint na Mumhan.

    Go cinnte, tá ardmheas agamsa freisin ar mo chairde gaoil as Shasana Nua, ach úsáidfidh mé do mhagadh an chéad uair eile a gháireann siad nuair a deirim “spuds.” [Is tosaitheoir leis an nGaeilge mé, mar sin tá súil agam gur dúirt mé é sin ceart.] 😆

    in reply to: Imperative usage in a group #45378
    Duncan
    Participant

    Thanks for the explanation of “fata,” Onuvanja. And I love your quote; I could adapt that to the crowd here in South Dakota to the time fixing and eating spuds compared with saying poh-tay-tohs…GRMA!

    🙂

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