Roibeard

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  • Roibeard
    Participant

    In reality, in fact, it seems that creating a three-dialect distinction that works in every case runs counter to reality. In fact, there seem to be many many dialects all of which have their own unique features. You can make generalizations that break these out into the three categories, but you will inevitably find examples which betray this scheme. That’s my observation, anyways.

    My teacher once had me reading a book that was written by someone who, like her, was from Conamara. We came across a word (which I unfortunately can’t recall right now) but I knew it wasn’t a word she would have used so I asked her about it. She said, “oh, that’s how they say it up in his place.” I said “I thought you were from the same area” and she said, “oh no, he’s about five miles up the road.”

    Roibeard
    Participant

    I remember listening to Raidió Fáilte a while back and there was a program where someone was reading through BC and they were replacing an- with iontach. I don’t remember if they made any other dialectal changes to it but Dáithí, that may be a place for you to start. I’m sure they have the podcasts up on their website.

    Roibeard
    Participant

    ‘Iontach’ is certainly the usual version in Ulster, but “an-” is used too.

    Thanks. Would you use one or the other depending on the situation or are they roughly interchangeable? Also, would there be a hyphen after iontach conecting it to whatever it was intensifying?

    Roibeard
    Participant

    i think Ulster speakers may use iontach instead of an- as an intensifier but i’m not sure.

    Are you trying to re-create dialect-specific versions of BC ?

    Roibeard
    Participant

    Buntús Cainte is definitely written in the Caighdeán Oifigiúil but the speakers on the recordings are Conamara speakers.

    Also, I think in Munster they still would use seo if the preceeding noun ends in a slender consonant?

    in reply to: Munster dialect #43570
    Roibeard
    Participant

    If you’re unable to find it, here’s a link to it. It looks like you can either view it online or download it as a PDF.

    http://archive.org/details/TeachYourselfIrish

    in reply to: Munster dialect #43530
    Roibeard
    Participant

    Also, didn’t someone create a PDF or something like that of the old TYI by Dillon / Ó Cróinín ? I remember that (along with the sound files) being available free online a few years ago.

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