Wee_Falorie_Man

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  • in reply to: Clancy Brothers song Finnegan’s Wake #45857
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    It’s definitely T’anam ‘on diabhal in Munster and Connacht (I’ve also heard Th’anam ‘on diabhal in Kerry).
    I don’t know about Ulster.

    in reply to: Clancy Brothers song Finnegan’s Wake #45831
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    I think it’s diabhal not diabhail.
    It’s like saying “Well, I’ll be damned!” in English.

    in reply to: le=”in order to”? #45774
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    To me, it’s easier to think of le as meaning “for the purpose of” in sentences like this, because this definition works with lots of different kinds of sentences that use le in a similar way.

    An bhfuil éinní le n-ithe agat? – Have you got anything to eat? (for the purpose of eating)
    Ní raibh faic le n-ól. – There was nothing to drink. (for the purpose of drinking)
    An bhfuil pioc le feiscint anso? – Is there nothing to see here? (for the purpose of seeing)

    Of course, “in order to” works in the particular sentence that you posted, but “for the purpose of” works in not just your sentence, but in lots of sentences that use le in that way – it works for me, anyway.

    in reply to: i ndáiribh #45677
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    OH! Thank you. Hm, how do you say “Psst, you may have a typo” in Irish?

    Hmmm … I’d say something like:

    B’fhéidir gur dheinis dearmhad, dar liomsa. (I think that maybe you’ve made a mistake.)

    in reply to: i ndáiribh #45675
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    I think “i ndáiribh” is a typo.

    It’s i ndáiríribh which has thousands of hits on Google.

    in reply to: An Rí an Domhnaigh #45647
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    That’s a very good, very direct, translation that you found – perfect for someone who is learning the language! 🙂
    Needless to say, poetic license is not usually very helpful to learners.

    in reply to: Pronunciation and reading. #45644
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    I’d say é is pronounced like “ay” (as in DAY)

    That’s the problem with trying to use English phonetics for non-English sounds. To my ear, the é sound is somewhere in between “eh” and “ay” – except in words like scéal, for example, where it sounds more like “ee”.

    in reply to: Pronunciation and reading. #45642
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    I’m more hung up on accent marks than anything else. I think I have the general idea but I get very confused on the vowels like é á and í. How are they pronounced in relation to English?

    é – “eh”
    á – “aw”
    í – “ee”

    This is roughly how they’re pronounced, but I recommend listening closely to a native speaker, instead of relying on English phonetics.

    in reply to: Pronunciation and reading. #45639
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    Well, actually, she pronounces slender t´ quite different from English ch and slender d´ different from English j. To say “t´=ch and d´= j” is an approximation or simplification which might be useful for a total beginner (who probably is not at all able to hear the difference between deo and Joe)

    Ah, I see what you mean. 🙂

    in reply to: Pronunciation and reading. #45636
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    I just started watching the video and I’ve already spotted a very obvious error. The word for eclipsis is urú, not úrú which is another word entirely; these two words are pronounced differently and have totally different meanings.

    Also, I disagree with lots of the pronunciations that she gives. For example, I was taught that broad “t” does not sound like the letter “t” in English. Nor does a slender “t” sound like “ch” in English; slender “d” does not sound like “j”, etc. Maybe these are just dialect differences. I was taught by a native speaker from the south of Ireland, so I’m hoping that someone will come along and let you know if the pronunciations in the video are correct for another dialect.

    in reply to: I need some help with what I presume is conjugation #45596
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    Just letting you know:

    ubh is masculine in Munster:
    ubh – egg, an egg
    an t-ubh – the egg

    uibhe is the plural form of “eggs” (and of course, the genitive singular) in Munster:
    na huibhe – the eggs
    Itheann sé uibhe gach lá. – He eats eggs every day.

    Apparently, they say uibheacha in other places; I just wanted to let you know that this kind of thing can vary according to dialect.

    in reply to: I need some help with what I presume is conjugation #45587
    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    ag – at

    agam – at me
    agat – at you
    aige – at him
    aici – at her

    againn – at us
    agaibh – at you all (plural)
    acu – at them

    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    In other cases, such as the verbal system, the Standard seems to lean more towards Munster Irish, using synthetic verb forms like “táimid”, though again, it frequently doesn’t coincide with it.

    That’s right; it frequently doesn’t coincide with it. Even in the case that you mentioned, it would be táimíd, with a síneadh fada over the last “i”.

    Here’s the past tense of all the forms of táim, for example:
    do bhíos
    do bhís
    do bhí sé
    do bhí sí

    do bhíomair
    do bhíobhair
    do bhíodar

    do bhíothas

    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    Apparently, Stenson is not a speaker of Munster Irish – she is quite mistaken on this one.

    p.s. I also have some doubts about a few of the things in An Leabhar Mór Bhriathra na Gaeilge, by the way.

    Wee_Falorie_Man
    Participant

    the CO doesn’t follow any living dialect, as far as preposition+article+noun is concerned…

    Yup – what Lughaidh said! 🙂

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