Cionaodh

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Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • in reply to: #41262
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    Do scríobh Wee Falorie Man:

    [color=purple]Okay, there are now 2 of us who are interested in participating in a Munster Irish study group. Actually, my girlfriend just told me that she would also like to participate, so that makes 3 people. A couple of people also wrote to me privately and said that they would like to be in the group but I guess they will be contacting Cionaodh directly if he decides to give it a try *crosses fingers*[/color]

    [color=purple]I think we would need a group with maybe half a dozen (or more?) active members. If the moderator decides to make a very structured group, which is the best kind in my opinion, we will have a certain amount of time to finish each lesson, with the moderator giving us some extra practice exercises as well as answering our dorky questions. I think it would be best if we were all working on the same thing, like getting through Teach Yourself Irish for example, or whatever the moderator wants to work on, so that we will have a common goal – this will give our group focus and a much better chance of succeeding, I think.[/color]

    When I taught Progress in Irish and First Steps in Irish via Yahoo groups, each lesson was explained at the beginning of the week, and any supplemental notes/materials were provided at that time. Links to answer keys & audio files were also provided. The learner then had one week to complete the exercises & use the group to discuss their difficulties or ask questions. We then went on to the next lesson, continuing this way until each book was completed. The only weeks we took a break were around major holidays. So a 72-lesson book like Progress in Irish takes about a year and a half. We found that a week is usually fine for most people to do their work and get questions answered. Some fell behind a bit, but caught up when we got to a holiday.

    Do scríobh Aislingeach:

    [color=green]I was wondering about the participation logistics. Is it similar to an online class? Does someone function as an instructor? Do participants all log on at designated days/times? Are there assignments? Things like that. I realized that the individual groups probably vary in operation, but is there some kind of general, overall format to online study groups? I don’t mind any of those things, just wondering how it works. Some structure would probably be very good for me. I have a tendency toward mental leap-frog. Like starting out with lesson one forming plurals and genitives in 1st declension, and somehow winding up eclipsing nouns in the dative case![/color]

    Lughaidh has described his Ulster Irish Study group for you — it’s a bit different than the ones I ran. In the case of the PII and FSII groups, I was the instructor, and everyone in the group received messages from me. Depending on the settings the member chose, he/she could choose to omit messages from other learners if they wanted, although I think most chose to receive those as well. The learner could interact with the group via e-mail whenever it suited her/him, or not at all (some people prefer to lurk). As far as possible, we kept the discussions focused on the lesson at hand, unless a topic required referral to a previous lesson. Leap-frogging and/or getting too far off topic was discouraged (though I invited all members to send off-topic questions to me off-list).
    Participation in these Yahoo groups waned as the lessons dragged on. Toward the end, I think that with each group I was left with a handful of persistent souls. This mirrors my experience with “real world” classes. The several times I’ve gone through the entirety of Progress in Irish with my students, I’d be lucky to have 5 people left, having started with dozens.
    With that sort of attrition in mind, were we to have another go at Teach Yourself Irish, I’d prefer to start with a dozen or more, so that after 27 lessons we might have 3 or 4 still hanging in there. If anyone has ideas for recruiting other learners, let’s hear them. I think we’d all benefit from starting with more than just a few learners.
    If we do this, I’d love to have a native Munster speaker get involved; I know enough of the dialect to answer most basic questions, but I don’t live that dialect on a daily basis. Perhaps one or more folks from Kerry/Cork might be induced to eavesdrop on the group and jump in whenever they feel something needs to be clarified?

    Do scríobh Ridire Dubh:

    [color=blue]I would recommend setting up a group using Skype. I think if it is structured around a chapter or topic at each session it would prove to be the most effective and efficient use of one’s time. The important thing is that the people who join have to be committed. [/color]

    A Skype group would exclude many (myself included) who have slower internet connexions and/or older computers. Yahoo groups, because they rely primarily on e-mail, are more inclusive. And there’s no need to worry about time zones!

    in reply to: #41211
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    Do scríobh Wee Falorie Man:

    [color=purple]Anyway, that’s how I made my way through the earlier lessons of Teach Yourself Irish.
    I’m hoping that someday somebody might want to start a study group with that particular book.
    * hint, hint Cionaodh[/color]

    Dia dhuit, a WFM.
    🙂

    Some years back we started going through the TYI lessons in the TYIMunster Yahoo group, but as I recall, the numbers of those participating dropped off quickly, and then the group got derailed over issues of Cork vs. Kerry Irish & old spellings vs. new ones. My groups dealing with C.O. Irish (Progress in Irish, First Steps in Irish) were much more successful for some reason.

    Nevertheless, I might be willing to give TYI another whirl if there’s enough new interest in pursuing this.

    in reply to: #40803
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    http://www.csis.ul.ie/focloir/

    It’s Irish-to-Irish, but learners will appreciate that it conjugates verbs & declines nouns/adjectives.

    (I just noticed the URL “http://193.1.97.44/focloir/” given above also points to the same URL I’ve given. Sorry for the duplication.)

    in reply to: #40735
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    I stumbled across a less-than-ideal solution which is a slight improvement.

    Go to http://itunes.apple.com/gb/itunes-u/scealta-mumhan/id477780810 in a browser, and click on “view in iTunes” on the left side. Doing so loads a Scéalta Mumhan page in iTunes. Neither “subscribe” nor “get all” work, but the files can now be downloaded one at a time by clicking the little “free” button to the right of each.

    It’s time consuming, but now I can put them on an mp3 player. Streaming was fairly useless for me — I only listen on the go.

    in reply to: #40733
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    GRMA, a WFM — as RD mentions, those steps get me to the list of Scéalta Mumhan files, but they can’t be downloaded or subscribed to, only played in streaming mode.

    The problem might be COGG-specific . . . I successfully downloaded a non-COGG “iTunes U” file earlier today without trouble.

    in reply to: #40729
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    Perhaps I’m doing something wrong, but none of the COGG material will download for me via iTunes, nor will it allow me to subscribe. I can play the files in a “streaming” fashion on the computer via iTunes, but that’s not exactly convenient.

    in reply to: #40592
    Cionaodh
    Participant
    in reply to: #40555
    Cionaodh
    Participant

    If Seanchaí Books is still in business, you might get a flyer/poster displayed on their shelves near the Irish language books. I haven’t been to C-ville in a while; they were located inside Blue Whale Books at 115 West Main St. (on the Mall) a few years back. The owners were Patrick & Krista Farrell. Besides an assortment of Irish-interest stuff in English, they stocked a selection of Irish language books & materials for learners.

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)