Héilics Órbhuí

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  • in reply to: Ní fheadar #46525
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Bhí mé ag fiafraí díom féin (lit. I was asking myself)

    Bhí mé ag déanamh iontais

    Níl a fhios agam (of course this usually means “I don’t know”, but perfectly suffices in context to mean the same thing, i.e. “níl a fhios agam an mbeadh sé sin ceart go leor” = “I didn’t know/I was wondering that would be alright”).

    Meas tú… – when posing as a rhetorical question to someone else, like “I wonder why she left..” when what you really mean is sort of implicitly like “why do you think she left?”

    There are other ways as well.

    As to the past tense of “ní fheadar” (which I usually just see as “n’fheadar”) I’m not sure if there is one. It’s a defective verb and I’ve personally never encountered it in any other form.

    in reply to: Slender R in Kilkenny and Ceathrú Thaidhg County Mayo #46506
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Sounds like a fairly typical slender r to me. I’m not a dialectical expert, but it’s definitely not just him.

    in reply to: Does this tea towel actually say anything? #46503
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Doesn’t look like Old Irish to me (which does look different from Modern Irish). This is pretty weird though… some of the letters are obviously seanchló in appearance (like the ‘d’) but then you have letters ‘Å“’ and the weird extended ‘w’-like character that just aren’t in Irish of any period, that I’m aware of.

    in reply to: Question on a translation #46497
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Like eadaoin says, “i gceist” generally translates into something like “in mind” or “at issue” (meaning the thing being discussed or that is pertinent) and is a common phrase.

    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Are you sure? I just searched both sites and found nothing.

    EDIT: Never mind, I found it… The search engine on both sites is not particularly good. Searching for “mac rí na héireann” on Litríocht brings up a lot of results and you have to hunt through them, and then when you finally do find it, the link doesn’t work. And on siopaleabhar, the title search brings up nothing, but if you hunt through the “new releases” section it is there. https://www.siopaleabhar.com/en/product/mac-ri-na-eireann/

    And apparently, to answer the original query, this is actually a translation of the book by Colum and not an entirely different book altogether.

    Thanks for bringing this to our attention!

    in reply to: Listening to RnaG and managing authentic audio #46474
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    I second the recommendation to read web sites dealing with similar subject matter to the broadcasts. It will help you build vocabulary and learn to recognize certain words or phrases that are common to each field (this is how we learn in our native languages, after all). You will get to the point where RnaG isn’t particularly challenging anymore. The real challenge (at least for me) comes in interpreting colloquial or older (i.e. more authentic) speakers.

    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    I’m far from an expert at the different dialects but I’ve never heard it said that way. Usually duit is similar to “ditch” or especially common in Connacht is the lenited form dhuit that sounds similar to “ghwitch”. I have heard Ulster speakers saying what almost borders on “detch”, but never “dewit” (like two syllables). Lughaidh is a a user here who is more of what I’d call an expert on Ulster, so he would probably know for sure.

    in reply to: Genitives of genitives? #46423
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    I’m not sure what conclusion to draw from this, but I don’t feel comfortable blaming careless Internet speech. My sense is that this is something most people haven’t been doing for quite a while. It’s not necessarily a surprise that good ol’ Munster boys like Gearóid think this is a thing.

    As I’m sure you know, a *lot* of people on GA are not native speakers, even if many of them sort of.. pretend to be. “Native speaker” itself is a pretty tricky designation. If you were raised early on with Irish but didn’t really speak it much from a teenager onward and it’s obvious that you’re quite rusty, are you still a native speaker? According to some definitions you would be, but in my opinion, not in a way that really matters, at least if we’re talking about your ability to authoritatively comment on rules such as this. Gearóid is a native. It’s a shame Lílis or Pádraig ó Cíobháin had nothing to say about it.

    But yes, I can usually count several mistakes in most posts in the group and I agree with the conclusion that even many of this and probably even the previous generations of legitimately native speakers make plenty of mistakes that the generation you reference would not have made. To me, the distressing ones are those of syntax. You can strip a language of quite a few “superficial” rules and it will still likely retain its essence, but when you’re using Irish words with essentially English syntax, it seems like one should ask themselves what is the point.

    in reply to: Genitives of genitives? #46421
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    As I see it, the point in 10.2.9 cited by Darán ó Dochartaigh is as good an answer as any, and it seems like the vast majority of the people in that thread say that you would not lenite in these cases. Even one of the people who said that you would later reversed his answer. It’s possible that certain speakers in certain dialects would do it, but I doubt that this makes up a significant number of people.

    in reply to: Genitives of genitives? #46411
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    I’m definitely in agreement that Google results should be scrutinized, but I see at least a few results for “an tseomra suí” popping up from books written by people at least fluent (I know Alex Hijmans is not a native speaker, but as far as I know he’s at least reasonably respected in the publishing community, as is Michael Davitt). Also plenty of results from gaois.ie. If I consider that I also have just never encountered a situation where a noun was lenited like that and I see no rule in the above-cited sections nor in my own search through my copy of the book, I see no evidence that something like “an tseomra shuí” to be correct. I’m sure Labhrás will weigh in on this eventually, but I’ll be incredibly surprised if he says that this is legit.

    in reply to: Genitives of genitives? #46409
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    I hate to dispute what Lughaidh says because I’ve not near the expertise that he does, but I don’t think I’ve *ever* seen this in all my reading. Maybe I missed it but I don’t see a rule cited that applies to this situation.

    in reply to: Synthetic Verbs #46408
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    I don’t live in Ireland so I have only written sources to go by, but I think these days “dúirt siad” is much more common, although you probably hear “dúradar” by older people and Munster speakers. I did a quick search on corpas.focloir.ie and confirms that, at least among their sources, it is true that “dúradar” has much higher frequency in Munster Irish. It might also be worth noting that a basic Google search returns about 3 times more entries for “dúirt siad” as it does for “dúradar”.

    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    The Irish number system is considerably more complicated than most other languages you will find. As Labhrás says, when counting (i.e. with “a” preceding the number) you say “dó” and before a noun it is “dhá”. However, note that when preceded by “an” it becomes “dá”. So in your example “tá dhá mhír sa chlár” = there are two items in the program, if talking about them in the definite “bhí an dá mhír go hiontach” = the two items were excellent. Additionally, if you are saying something like “one or two of ___ ” it becomes “dhó” (ex. uair nó dhó = one or two times, focal nó dhó = a word or two). Honestly, I would not stress too much about all the different situations and just try to learn from example.

    in reply to: ‘Arm’ i nGaeilge? #46385
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Dar liomsa, is annamh nach bhfuil sé sách soiléir ón gcomhthéacs céard atá i gceist le ‘lámh’ (‘arm’ nó ‘hand’). Agus is amhlaidh an focal ‘cos’, chomh maith (‘foot’ agus ‘leg’).

    is annamh? Má deireann tú “ghortaigh mé mo lámh” nó “tá mo lámh nimhneach” nó “bhris mé mo lámh”… ní fios goidé atá i gceist.

    Is annamh. Ní chiallaíonn “annamh” nach bhfuil cás ar bith nach bhfuil sé soiléir. Cheapfainn go dtuigfeá é sin.

    in reply to: ‘Arm’ i nGaeilge? #46364
    Héilics Órbhuí
    Participant

    Dar liomsa, is annamh nach bhfuil sé sách soiléir ón gcomhthéacs céard atá i gceist le ‘lámh’ (‘arm’ nó ‘hand’). Agus is amhlaidh an focal ‘cos’, chomh maith (‘foot’ agus ‘leg’).

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 678 total)