Seosamh

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  • in reply to: Leabhar Nua #42219
    Seosamh
    Participant

    Chaith mé roinnt urchar ina threo. I fired a few shots in his direction. Assuming I have a really bad aim, then the bullets were wasted, even if the putitive victim, in American gangster parlance, was not.

    in reply to: Leabhar Nua #42217
    Seosamh
    Participant

    Rinne mé dearmad ar an tabac agus, ar ndóigh, substaintí eile nach é.

    in reply to: Leabhar Nua #42215
    Seosamh
    Participant

    If you want just one equivalent English word to translate the Irish word “caith”, then consider the word “consume”. Therefore people “consume” such things as money, clothes, drink, food, time, stones and bullets (in so far as they consume the energy of stones and bullets when they throw or fire them!).

    in reply to: Cáca nó Císte #42086
    Seosamh
    Participant

    Maybe there is a relationship between “ciste” and “císte”.
    “Ciste” meaning a “fund” etc. ie. “a store of money” and “císte” meaning a “cake” etc. ie. “a store of calories”.

    in reply to: Cáca nó Císte #42076
    Seosamh
    Participant

    Difficult to know. Maybe a “cáca” is more associated with something like a wedding cake or a birthday cake something in the confectionary line and a “císte” is more traditional like an oaten cake or wheaten cake.

    in reply to: #40370
    Seosamh
    Participant

    Maybe “Tá an cruth sin orainn go léir anseo” translating as “we’re all that shape here” followed perhaps by an embarrased little laugh.

    in reply to: #40364
    Seosamh
    Participant

    There was a republican paramilitary organisation back in the sixties known as “Saor Éire”. I always understood it as “Free Ireland” “free” being an adjective. In Irish the adjective usually comes after the noun but in certain circumstances it can come before the noun. Any opinions anyone?

    in reply to: #40363
    Seosamh
    Participant

    I understood that the Irish word “rince” and the English words “rink” and “ring” are all connected. They all refer to the action of somehow going around in a ring, as in dancing, skating etc. So I reckon both “rince” and “damhsa” are loan words.

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